Tag: Tv advert
2011
11.21

Tesco’s 2011 Christmas advert has heightened our festive senses here at BLOGDIR. It features a short but sweet reference within the advert copy, “We’re keeping London in Turkey”, along with a beautiful shot of our sea front. Although quite a few places are mentioned, we can’t help but feel proud of our merry little town getting national coverage!

Go on, leave us a comment on this post
2011
08.22

I was watching TV a few nights ago when I came across a very cute, clever advert that has since been passed around BLOGDIR. The new Elastoplast advert features a childish animation style, built from plasters, and uses a voiceover of a young boy telling the story of how he hurt his knee.

Elastoplast have advertised in the past, mainly for their innovative new products and to keep a strong market share (in 2006 Elastoplast held 47% market share), but this advert stands out so much due to the simplicity of it, driven by great planning and strong creativity from TBWA. Throughout the first 25 seconds or so, I had no idea on how the TV ad would come together to make sense. I wasn’t even sure if people would realise it was advertising plasters! However, at the adverts conclusion, the boy recalls that the giraffe bumped his knee and he needed a plaster ? the tagline is unveiled (‘Every Elastoplast tells a story’). The entire advert and branding beautifully come to life and flood emotion between you and the product (even though effectively Elastoplast is a plaster, and an expensive plaster at that, compared to competitors). Appealing to both parents ? relating the story to their own children ? and to children, due to the quirky animation and use of a funny story. Furthermore, it is a prime example of how brilliant effective adverts can be created with minimum expense!
Further research shows this advert was a viral in 2008/2009, before being released as a TV ad this year. Elastoplast has created promotional ties with the campaign. Check out their website here. http://www.elastoplast.co.uk/

Go on, leave us a comment on this post
2011
01.31

At DNA we regularly discuss TV adverts we have seen and critique them. One that I have seen recently that caught my attention, not so much for the visual aspect of the advert, but for the script writing was the California – Misconception TV advert. It’s fantastic. It plays on all the ‘stereotypes’ that we all associate with California, but conveys it as a ‘misconception’, when in fact we all know that these things are true, or believe them to be true. It’s very tongue in cheek, but it is delivered in a way that conjures up a sense of fun, excitement and also shows off what is wonderful about California. The only criticism (if there is one), is that the advert is great in itself and would have worked just as well without the need to use so many celebrities. Let me know what you think, or send us links to any adverts that you have been impressed with.

Article by Paul Mabin – Managing Director

Go on, leave us a comment on this post
2011
01.15

After the recent completion of the Rowcroft Sleep Walk website and the application of the cosy, pajama fabric textures throughout the supporting imagery, we’ve spotted similar styles trending all over the shop. With a nod to the fantastic Pixels short, here’s our favorite example, both within the charming game itself and in the accompanying trailer for Kirby’s Epic Yarn…

Another upcoming fabric styled example is Little Big Planet 2. The Comfort ads are well worth a mention too!

Only 1 comment! Come on, add your two penneth worth
2019
01.14

Spam Up!

One of the most irritating adverts on TV at the moment may yet turn out to be one of the most memorable. But for all the wrong reasons.
Spam, originally launched in the UK in 1941, is making a come-back. Or so it’s manufacturers Hormel Foods are hoping. Among other promotions, they are pinning their hopes on a dreadful TV spot with an even cheesier catch-phrase, “Spam Up!”
The ad is right up there with all the other “worst ads ever”, such as Cillit Bang, online Bingo games and Just For Men.
But why did they pay big bucks to air such dire stuff? I presume they DID pay their performers…? I nearly called them actors, but that would be stretching the point. The look-and-feel of the adverts remind me of those awful 1960s washing powder adverts. They weren’t very believable either!
It may be a calculated gamble, but Hormel (via their ad agency Marsteller) may  have deliberately produced a retro-styled ad purely to cash in on the wartime heritage and 1950s-60s popularity of the product. Yes, it was popular once. Even the Monty Python team used it for one of their classic comedy moments.
Will a new generation of processed meat lovers be enticed to buy Spam in sufficient numbers to cover the ad agency fee? We’ll see…

One of the most irritating adverts on TV at the moment may yet turn out to be one of the most memorable. But for all the wrong reasons.

Spam, originally launched in the UK in 1941, is making a come-back. Or so it’s manufacturers, Hormel Foods, are hoping. Among other promotions, they are pinning their hopes on a dreadful TV spot with an even cheesier catch-phrase, “Spam Up!”

The ad is right up there with all the other ‘worst ads ever’, such as Cillit Bang, online Bingo games and Just For Men. It even has its own appreciation group on Facebook (hmmm – I wonder who put that there?!).

But why did they pay big bucks to air such dire stuff? I presume they DID pay their performers…? I nearly called them actors, but that would be stretching the point. The look-and-feel of the adverts remind me of those awful 1960s washing powder adverts. They weren’t very believable either!

It may be a calculated gamble, but Hormel (via their ad agency Marsteller may have deliberately produced a retro-styled ad purely to cash in on the wartime heritage and 1950s-60s popularity of the product. Yes, it was popular once. Even the Monty Python team used it for one of their classic comedy moments.

Will a new generation of processed meat lovers be enticed to buy Spam in sufficient numbers to cover the ad agency fee? We’ll see…

(Opinion: John Dawkins, designer)

Read our 2 lovely comments
2009
01.21

One of my design heroes is undoubtedly British graphic designer and consummate typographer Jonathan Barnbrook. Renown and admired for his pivotal role in British graphics and his strong political views and contribution to social causes, Barnbrook strives to use the power of his design skills as a weapon for social change and for the moral good.

I was pleased therefore, when I spotted Barnbrook?s unmistakable ?Virus? fonts in the latest British Heart Foundation television advert. Directed by Barnbrook, ?The spot features a Virtual Heart Simulator, alongside a typographic treatment by Barnbrook of various words from the voiceover.??CR. Whilst undeniably graceful, and wonderfully paced, I do slightly wonder at the choice of some of Barnbrook?s self-designed typefaces ? as beautifully crafted and animated as they are. A pleasant change and real step away from recent BHF advertising.

Now to go home and dust off my signed copy of ?The Barnbrook Bible??ahhh.

Take a look at the advert here.

(Opinion: Jon Price ? Designer)

Go on, leave us a comment on this post