2019
07.27

When up in London at the weekend, I spotted an excellent billboard for Inception, displayed on the Odeon Leicester Square tower (the same as the top left billboard below). The concept of blurring realities works fantastically throughout the suite. Beneath it is a poster comparison with The Dark Knight – hmmm, there appears to be a trend forming with Christopher Nolan films…

(Opinion: Jon Price ? Designer)

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2019
07.22

Earlier in the year, Paul, Simon, Matt, Rob and Jon headed down to a Design In Devon meet to see D&AD president Simon ‘Sanky’ Sankarayya discuss ‘The changing landscape of digital design’. Whilst departing his knowledge of interactive design, social media trends and their benefits to clients and audiences, he used this inspiring video as an example of ‘hacking’ technology and breaking the boundaries of interactivity within non-commercial, self initiated projects. It has to be shared ? the amazing EyeWriter, ‘a low-cost eye-tracking apparatus & custom software that allows graffiti writers and artists with paralysis resulting from Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to draw using only their eyes’.

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2019
07.17

We all believe that computer gaming over the past few years has become more interactive. To date, most of the ‘so called’ interactive games, still put you as another character within the game, such as ‘Drake’ in Uncharted (PS3). However, you are never actually yourself within the game. But surely, the whole point of interaction, is the ability to truly interact with the environment and the character/s within that environment and that they can react with you. I’m not talking about wearing a headset, or some eyewear trickery. What I’m talking about is the next generation of gaming, where you can talk to characters, show facial expressions and build a relationship with a character through the TV/Computer screen. You will have the ability to have conversations and truly interact with their environment in ways that you thought would never be possible. Anyway, enough of me waffling on, take a look for yourself – be prepared to be blown away – I was.

Article by Paul Mabin – Creative Director / Managing Director

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2019
07.16

It would seem that more than ever, designers, animators and filmmakers are using text within a real-world context. The release of Ubisoft’s Splinter Cell: Conviction saw the visual feature of mission objective reminders being projected into the environment, mapped over 3D space. The result is quite striking within gameplay and not only creates a unique visual style but as they are never part of a HUD, gameplay is that much more organic and free flowing – see the Developer Diary. Another nice example of a similar technique was used in CodeMaster’s GRID ? which placed text into the world as lit and rendered 3D objects, allowing the player spin and pivot the camera around it in menu navigation and replays.

These techniques have been used for years within film title sequences, but there appears to be a growing trend to integrate them into the main viewing/user experience itself, which I for one am a fan of but only when used sparingly and most importantly, appropriately. David Fincher’s Panic Room title sequence is frequently noted as the first example of genuine 3D text in the real world, but I would like highlight a recent addition to the list… Zombieland. In this instance, the comedy horror was enhanced by the integration of its trademark rules being animated in-scene. They create laughs through comic timing and use this visual reinforcement to push rules such as ‘#2 Double Tap’ not only into the annals of cult film quotations but into the urban dictionary. Zombieland works because it pokes fun at itself, it breaks the 4th wall and has post-modern winks ? feeling just as much like you’re racking up hi-scores in a video game as enjoying a passive cinematic experience. It’ll be interesting how many more films attempt to use environmental typography as a gimmick in a similar way, see: (Scott Pilgrim vs. the World)
before it gets tired. Enough talk, let’s watch;


(Opinion: Jon Price ? Designer)
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2019
07.09

When First DataBank came to DNA with their brief for a corporate DVD presentation to be used in a sales pack and on exhibition stands, we knew exactly what they needed. As the UK?s leading provider of drug databases and active clinical decision support, their subject matter can get more than a little complicated but with DNA’s long-standing relationship with FDB we were able to get under their skin to create this animated typographic presentation that makes it all the more clear.

The pharmaceutical sector is ruled by results and facts and that’s exactly what we drew upon to highlight the benefits of working with FDB, and the possible dangers if you don’t. In-house, DNA Advertising story boarded, animated, wrote a bespoke soundtrack and edited the presentation.

View this video on our YouTube Channel.

Check out some more of our video work on our Vimeo channel.

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2019
07.07
You may have read on the DNA Blog that we said goodbye to our web programmer, Chris Keeley a few months ago. He’s gone to further his career in software development. So now it’s time to introduce his replacement, Rob Barfield.
Rob joined us recently from local firm Integralvision where he and Simon Farrow, our Web Development Manager, were colleagues for four years. Rob’s background is in computer technology and he’s been interested in what goes on ‘under the hood’ since his schooldays. This led him to study Internet Technology & Networks at university before launching into a career in web programming.
So what skills does he bring to DNA? As well as being a nice guy (so he fits in really well here…), Rob’s proven ability to create bespoke websites will help us to offer even more complex web solutions than before. Content Management Systems, e-Commerce and payment gateways, integration with Google applications… all these skills and more come neatly packaged in our new colleague!
Rob says: “I’ll build whatever the customer needs, whether it’s a back end system or any other kind of interaction with the web”.
Having built more than 80 websites, Rob has the ideal skill set to help us up our game in the fast-moving world of web solutions. Here’s an example of his most recent work, carried out in conjunction with designer colleagues:
www.lesborjdelakasbah.com
Rob also has the distinction of being the only member of DNA’s staff to live within walking distance of the office. Welcome aboard, Rob!

You may have read in an earlier blog post that we said goodbye to our web programmer, Chris Keeley a few months ago. He’s gone to further his career in software development. So now it’s time to introduce his replacement, Rob Barfield.

Rob joined us recently from local firm Integralvision where he and Simon Farrow, our Web Development Manager, were colleagues for four years. Rob’s background is in computer technology and he’s been interested in what goes on ‘under the hood’ since his schooldays. This led him to study Internet Technology & Networks at university before launching into a career in web programming.

So what skills does he bring to DNA? As well as being a nice guy (so he fits in really well here…), Rob’s proven ability to create bespoke websites will help us to offer even more complex web solutions than before. Content Management Systems, e-Commerce and payment gateways, integration with Google applications… all these skills and more come neatly packaged in our new colleague!

Rob says: “I’ll build whatever the customer needs, whether it’s a back end system or any other kind of interaction with the web”.¬†Having built more than 80 websites, Rob has the ideal skill set to help us up our game in the fast-moving world of web solutions.

Rob also has the distinction of being the only member of DNA’s staff to live within walking distance of the office. Welcome aboard, Rob!

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2019
07.02

Back in April we won a pitch for an adoption campaign for Somerset County Council. So with a spring in our step we set to work creating a brand identity, advertising, a website and a whole load of marketing collateral. We have really enjoyed the challenge, and with the website going live yesterday we thought you might want to take a look ? www.adoptioninsomerset.org.uk. The lead on the project was Somerset County Council’s PR and Communication Officer, Lyndsey Mayhew, here?s what she had to say about the process, ?It has been a pleasure to work with DNA on the adoption¬†campaign. Right from the start, I felt DNA really understood what we wanted to achieve and I was impressed with the background research and the ideas that were developed beyond the creative brief. The creation of the site and campaign tools could not have been smoother and the account team were excellent, always on the end of the phone and with no request too difficult!? Thanks Lyndsey! Next up we?ve been lucky enough to secure the Fostering in Somerset campaign too! Watch this space for updates on how we get on.

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2019
07.02

We seem to be designing more exhibition stands than ever here at DNA, and for one client in particular we?re working on them non-stop. As one of the world leaders in chemical engineering they attend exhibitions regularly, on every continent. Recently we have worked on stand designs across a variety of their product offering: Offshore Technology, Automotive and Rail to name a few. With two more exhibition stands in the studio at the moment we?re keeping busy and looking forward to seeing how our designs go down in Berlin and Orlando over the summer!

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